Orlando Furioso: Part One: Pt. 1 (Classics)

Contents:
  1. Сведения о продавце
  2. Orlando Furioso: Part One by Ludovico Ariosto
  3. Покупки по категориям
  4. Orlando Furioso Pt. I : A Romantic Epic: Part 1 by Ludovico Ariosto (1975, Paperback)

Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Orlando Furioso by Ludovico Ariosto. Part One by Ludovico Ariosto ,. One of the greatest epic poems of the Italian Renaissance, Orlando Furioso is an intricate tale of love and enchantment set at the time of the Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne's conflict with the Moors.

When Count Orlando returns to France from Cathay with the captive Angelica as his prize, her beauty soon inspires his cousin Rinaldo to challenge him to a duel - but during t One of the greatest epic poems of the Italian Renaissance, Orlando Furioso is an intricate tale of love and enchantment set at the time of the Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne's conflict with the Moors.

When Count Orlando returns to France from Cathay with the captive Angelica as his prize, her beauty soon inspires his cousin Rinaldo to challenge him to a duel - but during their battle, Angelica escapes from both knights on horseback and begins a desperate quest for freedom. This dazzling kaleidoscope of fabulous adventures, sorcery and romance has inspired generations of writers - including Spenser and Shakespeare - with its depiction of a fantastical world of magic rings, flying horses, sinister wizardry and barbaric splendour.

Сведения о продавце

Paperback , pages. Published May 29th by Penguin Classics first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Orlando Furioso , please sign up. Lists with This Book. View all 17 comments. Jul 16, J. Keely rated it it was amazing Shelves: Perhaps it speaks more to the age I live in than that of the author, but I'm always surprised to find a reasonable, rational mind on the other end of the pen.

Though his work is full of prejudice and idealism, it is constantly shifting, so that now one side seems right, and now the other. His use of hyperbole and oxymoron prefigures the great metaphysical poets, and like them, these are tools of rhetoric and satire. Every knight is 'undefeatable', every woman 'shames all others by her virtue', a Perhaps it speaks more to the age I live in than that of the author, but I'm always surprised to find a reasonable, rational mind on the other end of the pen.

Every knight is 'undefeatable', every woman 'shames all others by her virtue', and it does not escape Ariosto that making all of them remarkable only makes more obvious the fact that none of them are. Ariosto's style flies on wings, lilting here and there, darting, soaring. He makes extensive use of metafiction, both addressing the audience by means of a semi-fictionalized narrator and by philosophical explorations of the art of poetry itself, and the nature of the poet and his patron. As with most epics, Ariosto's asides to the greatness of his patron are as jarring as any second spot.

His relationship to his various patrons was extremely difficult for him, as he was paid a mere pittance and constantly drawn away from his writing to deliver bad news to the pope if you're thinking that's a bad job, Ariosto would agree--the See nearly had him killed. This is likely the reason that these moments of praise fall to the same unbelievable hyperbole as the rest. His patrons could hardly be angry at him for constantly praising them, but his readers will surely be able to recognize that his greatest compliments are the most backhanded, and merely serve to throw into stark contrast the hypocrisy of man.

Since we will all be oblivious hypocrites at some point for most of us, nearly all the time , the only useful defense is the humility to admit our flaws. Great men never have it so easy: Though Ariosto often lands on the side of the Christians, his Muslims are mighty, honorable, well-spoken, and as reasonable in their faith.

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The only thing which seems to separate the two sides is their petty squabbling. Likewise, he takes a surprisingly liberal view of sex and gender equality, with lady knights who are not only the match for any man, but who need no marriage to complete their characters. He even presents homosexuality amongst both sexes, though with a rather light hand. His epic is not the stalwartly serious sort, like Homer, Virgil, or Dante. Ariosto is a humanist, and has none of the fetters of nationalism or religious idealism to hold him in place.

His view of man is a contrary, shifting, absurd thing. The greatest achievements of man are great only in the eyes of man. By showing both sides of a conflict, by supporting each in turn, Ariosto creates a space for the author to inhabit.

He is not tied to some system of beliefs, but to observation, to recognition; not to the ostensible truth of humanity, but to our continuing story. Ariosto took a great leap from Petrarch's self-awareness. While Petrarch constantly searched and argued in his poems, he found a sublime comfort in the grand unknown. Ariosto is the great iconoclast, not only asking why of the most obvious conflicts, but of the grandest assumptions. The grand mystery is only as sacred as it is profane. Ariosto is also funny, surprising, and highly imaginative.

Though his work is defined by its philosophical view, this view is developed slowly and carefully. It is never stated outright, but is rather the medium of the story: The surface of the story itself is a light-hearted, impossible comedy. It is no more impossible than the grand heights of any other epic, but only seems so because it is not girt tightly with high-minded seriousness.

Perhaps Ariosto's greatest gift is that he is doing essentially the same thing all other authors do, the same situations and characters, but he makes you laugh to see it. To be able to look at life simply as it is and laugh is the only freedom we will ever know. It is all wisdom. For this gift, I hail fair Ariosto, the greatest of all epicists, all poets, all writers, all humanists, all men, and never to be surpassed. Aug 16, El rated it it was amazing Shelves: The part that really amazes me about this book is that it seems that it's mainly political, a story of war between the Christians and the Moors as the African King attacks Europe.

But it doesn't take long to realize that the true battle is the ultimate battle - the battle for poon. Orlando has his heart set on the lovely Angelica whom he steals from the Moors , but when he brings her home his cousin realizes he wants to tap that. While the boys are all distracted dueling each other, Angelica tak The part that really amazes me about this book is that it seems that it's mainly political, a story of war between the Christians and the Moors as the African King attacks Europe.

While the boys are all distracted dueling each other, Angelica takes advantage of the situation and takes off because, y'know, she's her own woman and all, and boys are dumb. But Orlando's not having any of that, so he sets off after her; when he finds out she's fallen for another dude, well The problem is if it indeed can be considered a "problem" that this first volume is almost pages and it ends at the most inopportune time - in the middle of Orlando's greatest craze. Ariosto ended each chapter with a statement inviting readers to continue if they wanted to know more; he was the king of the cliffhanger.

I'm not sure who decided to end Vol 1 exactly where they did, but I'd like to punch that person in the proverbial nutsack.

Orlando Furioso: Part One by Ludovico Ariosto

This just means I have to get Vol 2 which has already proven to be difficult. As it was I found this at a neighborhood yard sale last year, and the guy I bought it from said he has never found Vol 2 either.


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  • Orlando Furioso: Part One.

To be fair, we're talking about used copies locally, not going to Amazon or Abe or Alibris or any of those other sites. Additionally the translator of Vol 1 is Barbara Reynolds; I don't have any previous experience with her translations that I'm aware of, so I don't know how she stacks up in the world of literary translations.

I do know I enjoyed the read, and only wrinkled my nose at a couple phrases which could easily be Ariosto's own original, awkward phrasing as well as the fault of the translator. I would expect that this is a relatively decent translation or else I would have given up on it a long time ago. Point is, now that I've read her translation of Vol 1, I most certainly need her translation and only her translation of Vol 2.

So now that's my goal. I'm not sure, but I feel fairly confident saying I don't think I've ever seen a used copy of this. But then maybe I missed it because I wasn't previously searching it out. There's so much going on in this book beyond the poon, beyond the politics and religion - there's magic too, including a magic ring before Tolkien even existed, thankyouverymuch and mythical creatures such as the hippogriff I want one. I was surprised at how quickly the story moved along, and it really is because there's just so much happening.

There are battle scenes in this poem that make The Iliad look like a Disney movie. It was freaking awesome. Let the record show, Orlando Furioso also had both. I'm now on a mission to read more fantasy especially older fantasy like this one to see just which a-hole started the trend. View all 21 comments. Jan 14, Caroline rated it it was amazing Shelves: Once again, I discover: I am absolutely loving this. And am chagrinned to find that I have been reading books and looking at artwork for decades that made reference to Ariosto without my realizing it. Those naked maidens chained to rocks rising from the sea, with a monster threatening?

Knights on a winged horse flashing a laser-endowed shield to stun the wicked? This is a review of the Barbara Reynolds translation. I first picked up Slavitt, but abandone Once again, I discover: I first picked up Slavitt, but abandoned it on reading in his forward that he tried to make Ariosto into Byron, and felt free to modernize the poem. He leaves at least half out. If I wanted to read Byron or a modern comic poet, I would. Plus, Reynolds is a scholar and includes a very helpful introduction and copious notes; lists of names, weapons and horses to remind you who is who; maps, etc.

At the top of each page are a few words summarizing the plot in those stanzas, to help you keep your bearings or look back at an event. Slavitt has no introduction to speak of and no helps. Reynolds makes marvelous poetry in English. With shrieks and gusts all headway it denies them, Each time they turn, it threatens to capsize them.

Sometimes a battle such as this a fly Against a mastiff boldly undertakes In August, or Septembre, or July, Those months of dust, of vintage, or of stacks of ripened grain, well garnered and laid by. Stinging his snout and eyes, the insect makes Unceasing darts and sallies, till, mayhap, The mastiff is revenged in one fell snap.

This is a very modern-feeling poem in the constant presence of the narrator. He lays on the irony and acknowledges both it and the comic circumstances of his characters. Knights swearing to eternally protect women they then find are evil harridans, but are saddled literally with for ensuing cantos due to the honor of their oath. I kept a big sheet of paper with columns for the major characters myself so I could remember who they had rescued and who was enamored of whom.

Reynolds helps tremendously in the introduction with her clear explanation of the battle of Paris that is a main driver and event. She clarifies troop movements and includes a battle map. She also has maps of the frequent journeys via ship and hippogrif around the world. Our hero and heroines a woman knight as tough as they come are all over the top. Durindana is a sword. And in the self-same movement, as it seemed, He quickly ran another through the chest. He left his lance in him because he deemed That Durindana would now suit him best. Some heads he split in two, some torsos trimmed, And many throats he cut; and those who fled Totalled at least a hundred with the dead.

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View all 3 comments. Feb 06, Nathan "N. Recommended to Nathan "N. Perhaps the best damn swords-sorcerers-chivalry you'll ever find. I'd like to get around to a REAL review of sorts. Meanwhile, high rec's are left for your benefit. Here is an epic poem with trips to the moon and ass-kicking lady knights. An ethic and a world strange to us yet familiar enough that we might find here possibilities long lost to time. I recommend Barbara Reynold's older translation over the recent Sla Perhaps the best damn swords-sorcerers-chivalry you'll ever find.

I recommend Barbara Reynold's older translation over the recent Slavitt translation, which is probably very good, because with Reynold's you can get the whole poem while Slavitt, who translates only the first half, says wrongly , ". View all 11 comments.

Orlando Furioso Pt. I : A Romantic Epic: Part 1 by Ludovico Ariosto (1975, Paperback)

Il ne parle plus, il hurle comme un animal. Mar 01, Lucas rated it it was amazing. This is my favorite story of all time. It is a huge mideival epic about pages long that chronicles a war between France and Africa. There are scores of main characters from both sides of the fight and their stories are interwoven nicely. Characters include an overprotective sorceror who keeps interfering with the true hero's attempts to join the battle, a knight who is only fighting in order to gather all of the Trojan warrior Hector's armaments, an insanely powerful female knight who nev This is my favorite story of all time.

The book also has many fairy tale creatures and includes a trip to the dark side of the moon. It is even entertaining to track the story's legendary items as they change hands and certain heroes and villains try to obtain them. The central story, for which the book is named, is that of Count Orlando. Orlando is Charlamegne's nephew and the greatest of the paladins. Find your reading speed by taking one of these tests or by reading this book's description, below. To calculate your words per minute WPM reading speed, click the 'Start reading' button and read the entirety of the book's description below.

When you are done reading, click the 'Stop and calculate' button. The website will then calculate your reading speed and give you your WPM. The only unabridged prose translation of Ariosto's Orlando Furioso--a witty parody of the chivalric legends of Charlemagne and the Saracen invasion of France--this version faithfully recaptures the entire narrative and the subtle meanings behind it.

For over years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more. You read this over an average of words per minute. Toggle navigation Menu Reading Length.

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